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Photo: Courtesy private collection; photo by Laura Wulf
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Tilt-top table


Object number

RIF508

Maker

Maker Unknown

Dimensions

Height: 66.04 cm (26 in.); Width: 74.93cm (29 1/2 in.)

Date

1750–1780

Current location

Private collection

Geography

Made in Newport, Rhode Island
(view a map of Rhode Island)

Medium

Mahogany (primary and secondary)

Marks

None

Inscriptions

None

Style

Queen Anne Style

Provenance

Private collection, 1985

Construction

The circular, one-board top has a raised and beaded edge and is fitted underneath with two cleats, to which it is joined by four screws apiece–two countersunk screws near each shaped end and two surface-mounted screws in each central, deeper portion. The top tilts by means of pins in the top of the triangular pedestal that are set in holes in the cleats. It is secured by a circular brass catch, fixed to the underside of the top by three screws. The tooth of the catch fits into a brass plate attached with screws to the edge of the pedestal top. The triangular pedestal top, which is attached to the case below by four countersunk screws, has one straight and two incurvate sides. The case below has three incurvate sides separated by fluted half-columns with turned bases and capitals. One incurvate side contains a hinged door opening to five concave-blocked and graduated drawers, whose fronts are attached to their sides with dovetail joints, having finely cut pins with half-pins above and half-pins with rabbets, into which are glued the drawer bottoms, below. The tops of the drawer sides are arched and flush with the tops of the drawer fronts. The drawers are hexagonal, having incurvate angled sides mitered to the straight drawer sides. There are three molded and chamfered panels at the base of the pedestal. On its underside are three iron straps, each of slightly different configuration and attached with screws. They cover and reinforce the joints between the pedestal base and the three cabriole legs. The legs have half-round panels at their knees and shod snake feet. One leg is fitted on its underside with an iron strap. Examined by P.E. Kane, August 22, 2012; notes compiled by T.B. Lloyd.

See also


Bibliography

Patricia E. Kane et al., Art and Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650–1830, exh. cat. (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Art Gallery, 2016), 40, 210, 326–327, no. 65, fig. 1.