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Dining table


Object number

RIF636

Maker

Maker John Goddard, 1723/24–1785

Dimensions

68.58 x 40.005 x 115.253 cm (27 x 15 3/4 x 45 3/8 in.)

Date

1774

Current location

Unknown

Geography

Made in Newport, Rhode Island
(view a map of Rhode Island)

Medium

Mahogany (primary); maple (secondary)

Marks

None

Inscriptions

"John H. Brown," on label glued to underside of table

Style

Chippendale

Provenance

James Atkinson (1722–1806), Newport, Rhode Island, 1774; by descent to his son Captain John Botkin Atkinson (1776–1847), Newport, Rhode Island; by descent to his son James Atkinson (1804–1879); by descent to his daughter Louisa F. Atkinson (1840–after 1930); sold to George E. Vernon, Newport, Rhode Island; sold to John Nicholas Brown (1900–1979), Providence, Rhode Island, 1927; by descent in his family, until 2005; consigned to Sotheby's, New York, January 20–21, 23, 2005, lot 1201

Associated names

James Atkinson
George E. Vernon and Company
John Nicholas Brown
Sotheby's

Construction

The rectangular square-edged single-board top is attached to its single-board square-edged falling leaves with three hinges (replaced) apiece. The joint between the top and leaves is quarter round. Under the central portion of the top are three (one missing) transverse braces which extend through rectangular voids in the hinged and stationary rails and are (now) screwed (once nailed) into the top. The top of each hinged leg rail is cut out to fit over the braces under the top. The hinged rails are joined to the stationary rails with rosehead nails. The legs are attached to the rails by means of mortise and tenons, each joint exhibiting two wood pins. The stationary rails are attached to the shaped skirts with dovetail joints. The tops of the hinged legs are rabbeted to fit into the support rails. Each has a five-knuckled wood square hinge. The angular square-sectioned cabriole legs have crisply carved tendons and less well-carved claws clasping spherical ball feet with undercut talons (some broken). Examined by P. E. Kane and M. Taradash, January 19, 2005; notes compiled by T. B. Lloyd.

Notes

The table is attributed to John Goddard based on its association with one listed in a receipt from Goddard to James Atkinson in 1774.

Bibliography

Ralph E. Carpenter, Jr., "The Newport Exhibition," Antiques 64, no. 1 (July 1953): 40, fig. 10.
Ralph E. Carpenter, Jr., The Arts and Crafts of Newport, Rhode Island, 1640–1820 (Newport, R.I.: Preservation Society of Newport County, 1954), 87, no. 59, ill.
Liza Moses and Michael Moses, "Authenticating John Townsend's and John Goddard's Queen Anne and Chippendale Tables," Antiques 121, no. 5 (May 1982): 1132–1133, fig. 4–4a, 6 (right).
Michael Moses, Master Craftsmen of Newport: The Townsends and Goddards (Tenafly, N.J.: MMI Americana Press, 1984), 119, 207, 219, fig. 3.37a, 4.6, 5.6.
Christie's, New York, Important American Furniture, Silver, and Folk Art: Featuring English Pottery from the Collection of the Late Robert J. Kahn and the Lafayette-Washington Pistols, sale cat. (January 18–19, 2002), 202.
Sotheby's, New York, Important Americana including Property of Descendants of John Nicholas Brown, sale cat. (January 20–21, 23, 2005), 312–15, lot 1201, ill.
Amy Coes, "A Bill of Sale from John Goddard to John Brown and the Furniture It Documents," Antiques 169, no. 5 (May 2006): 132.