image of object
From: Brock Jobe and Myrna Kaye, New England Furniture: The Colonial Era (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1984): 173, cat. 26
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Chest-on-chest


Object number

RIF833

Maker

Maker Unknown

Dimensions

Overall: 210.503 x 102.553 x 54.769cm (82 7/8 x 40 3/8 x 21 9/16in.)

Date

1765–1785

Current location

Historic New England (www.historicnewengland.com), formerly Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities

Geography

Made in Newport, Rhode Island
(view a map of Rhode Island)

Medium

Soft maple (primary); white pine (secondary)

Marks

None

Inscriptions

None

Style

Chippendale

Provenance

Elizabeth R. Vaughan, Hamilton, Maine, before 1949; bequeathed to the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (now Historic New England), Boston,1949

Associated names

Elizabeth R. Vaughn

Construction

The scrolled pediment has a conforming bonnet roof and full backboard. The one-piece cornice molding is fastened not only to the sides and pediment but also along the entire depth of the bonnet opening. The continuation of the molding from the front to the back of the bonnet opening is an unusual feature, seen occasionally in Newport and its environs but rarely elsewhere. The one-piece finial fits into a hole in the fluted plinth. Inside the upper case against the back, a horizontal slat, which is made like a drawer divider, braces the drawer supports for the two small drawers. The lip of the waist molding overlaps the lower case. The lower case top is two narrow boards dovetailed to the sides but separated from each other by a 9 1/2-inch gap. The bracket feet are glued and nailed to the base molding with one rosehead nail in each element. The rear feet are constructed in an unusual manner that appears in some Newport furniture: the rear element of each rear foot fits into a groove in the thick side element. The drawer fronts cut to a thumbnail on all four edges, are lipped at the top and sides. Each drawer bottom is chamfered to fit into grooves in the front and sides. The chest was refinished in this century to a light honey color. Traces of the original mahogany-colored wash remain. The bottom of the left rear foot has a three-inch pieced repair. Six support blocks for the feet are replacements. Source: Brock Jobe and Myrna Kaye,New England Furniture: The Colonial Era (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1984), 175.

Bibliography

Brock Jobe and Myrna Kaye, New England Furniture: The Colonial Era (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1984), 172–175, no. 26, ill.