image of object
From: Brock Jobe, Gary R. Sullivan, and Jack O'Brien, Harbor and Home: Furniture of Southeastern Masachusetts 1710–1850 (Hanover, N.H.: University Press of New England, 2009),133, pl. 41
Click the image to enlarge

Card table


Object number

RIF840

Maker

Maker Unknown

Dimensions

Closed: 74.77 x 93.19 x 38.42 cm (29 7/16 x 36 11/16 x 15 1/8 in.); Depth, open: 76.84 cm (30 1/4 in.)

Date

1780–1800

Current location

Historic New England (www.historicnewengland.com), formerly Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities

Geography

Made in Newport, Rhode Island
(view a map of Rhode Island)

Medium

Mahogany (primary); Spanish cedar (hinged rail); white pine (all other secondary wood)

Marks

Unknown

Inscriptions

Unknown

Style

Chippendale

Provenance

Reverend Myron S. Dudley (1837–1905), Nantucket, Massachusetts; by descent to his wife Mary Dudley (née Mary Marrett), Marrett House, Standish, Maine; by descent to Frances S. Marrett; given to the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (now Historic New England), Boston, 1959

Associated names

Reverend Myron S. Dudley
Mary Marrett Dudley
Frances S. Marrett
Frances S. Marrett

Construction

The front and side rails are shaped on both the facade and lower edge. Rope carving edges the skirt and a rope-carved bead is glued to the legs. Original knee brackets, embellishing the front legs only, are held in place with two small forged finishing nails each. The bottom edges of each leg are slightly chamfered. The table is constructed like a drop-leaf table; the leaf is supported by a swing leg. A thin block is set between the rear rail and the fixed hinge rail. Nails pass through the rear rail, block, and fixed hinge rail. A vertical quarter-round block is glued behind the dovetail joint holding the left side and the rear rail. A feature seen on some Newport work–cross braces dovetailed into the rails–does not appear on this table. Thirteen horizontal glue blocks secure the top to the frame. The top and leaf, each of one board, have rule hinges. The condition of the table is superb. Source: Brock Jobe and Myrna Kaye,New England Furniture: The Colonial Era (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1984), 293–294.

Notes

A number of card tables attributed to Rhode Island have facades with serpentine curves in plan and section, beading or gadrooning along the lower edge of the facade, blocked corners, stop-fluted legs, pierced corner brackets, and gouge decoration on the top leaf edge. See the related examples below. Closely related tables have straight legs; see, for example, RIF56. Other similar tables lacking some of the features shared by these two groups are recorded in the database as well.

See also


Bibliography

Brock Jobe and Myrna Kaye, New England Furniture: The Colonial Era (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1984), 291–294, no. 70, ill.
Nancy E. Richards and Nancy Goyne Evans, New England Furniture at Winterthur: Queen Anne and Chippendale Periods (Winterthur, Del.: Winterthur Publications, 1997), 272n1.
Brock Jobe, Gary R. Sullivan, and Jack O'Brien, Harbor and Home: Furniture of Southeastern Massachusetts, 1710–1850 (Hanover, N.H.: University Press of New England, 2009), 133–134, no. 41, pl. 41.