image of object
From: Brock Jobe and Myrna Kaye, New England Furniture: The Colonial Era (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1984), plate 8
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Side chair


Object number

RIF841

Maker

Maker Unknown
Maker: formerly attributed to John Goddard, 1723/24–1785

Dimensions

98.901 x 55.88 x 43.18cm (38 15/16 x 22 x 17in.) Height, seat: 41.434cm (16 5/16in.) Width, seat frame top edge: 1.588 cm (5/8 in.)

Date

1740–1760

Current location

Historic New England (www.historicnewengland.com), formerly Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities

Geography

Probably made in Massachusetts, formerly said to have been made in Rhode Island
(view a map of Rhode Island)

Medium

Black walnut (primary); soft maple (slip seat frame)

Inscriptions

Appears to be numbered "IIII" on seat and frame originally, and later (but old) addition of "IIIIII".

Style

Chippendale

Provenance

Charles Barrett, Sr. (1740–1808), Concord, Massachusetts, and New Ipswich, New Hampshire; by descent to his wife, Rebecca Barrett, 1808; by descent to her daughter-in-law, Martha Minot Barrett, 1838; by descent to her daughter, Mary Ann Barrett Bullard Hersey, 1842; by descent to her daughter, Sarah Jane Bullard, 1875; by descent to her cousin's stepdaughter, Laura Maria Barr, 1903; by descent to her sister, Caroline Barr Wade, 1948; given to the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (now Historic New England), Boston, 1948

Associated names

Charles Barrett, Sr.
Charles Barrett Jr.
George Barrett
Frances Ames Barrett
George Robert Barrett
Caroline Barr Wade
Caroline Barr Wade

Construction

The seat rails (III-29) and seat frame are identical in construction to those on the preceding chair. The medial stretcher is of a block-ended type that is joined with rectangular tenons to the side stretchers. The stiles – broader than those on the preceding examples – are pieced at their widest point, a common feature on chairs of this design. Rear brackets – not part of the preceding designs – are nailed in place. No corner blocks were ever present. The condition is excellent. The loose seat retains fragments of its original webbing and linen under-upholstery. Only reupholstered once before, the seat is covered in a reproduction stamped worsted. Source: Brock Jobe and Myrna Kaye. ,New England Furniture: The Colonial Era (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1984), 359–360.

See also


Bibliography

Brock Jobe and Myrna Kaye, New England Furniture: The Colonial Era (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1984), 93, 358–360, no. 99, fig. III-29.
Ellen Fineberg, "Barrett House, New Ipswich, New Hampshire," Antiques 129, no. 3 (March 1986): 646, Pl. III, ill.