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Dining table


Object number

RIF2925

Maker

Maker possibly by John Goddard, 1723/24–1785

Dimensions

Open: 68.58 x 148.59 x 140.97 cm (27 x 58 1/2 x 55 1/2 in.)

Date

1755–1775

Current location

Private collection

Geography

Made in Newport, Rhode Island
(view a map of Rhode Island)

Medium

Mahogany (primary); maple (hinged and stationary rails); sycamore (cross braces)

Marks

None

Inscriptions

Probably “T,” in graphite, on underside of top; illegible markings, in chalk, at numerous locations on rails

Style

Queen Anne

Provenance

Christie's, New York, June 12, 1982, lot 200. Israel Sack, Inc., New York, before 1984. Sotheby's, New York, January 24–27, 30, 1995, lot 2205. Israel Sack, Inc., New York, 1995. Christie's, New York, January 18–19, 2002, lot 377. Christie's, New York, September 28, 2011, lot 15. Christie's, New York, January 23, 24, and 27, 2014, lot 124; Christie's, New York, January 23, 2015, lot 151A

Associated names

Christie's
Sotheby's
Israel Sack, Inc.
Christie's
Unknown
Christie's New York

Construction

The single-board top has bowed ends and a quarter round edge. It is joined to its leaves by three pairs of iron hinges, each leaf thrice-screwed, one pair at the middle of the frame, the others at its ends. Each leaf bears extensive planing marks. The joint between top and leaves is quarter round. The top joins the frame by means of two transverse braces. Each is screwed into the top and passes through dovetail-shaped voids in both rails, ending in a shaped reserve containing a screw. Each swing rail is notched to accommodate the brace. There is one small horizontal glue block at a short rail. One brace has a later, L-shaped bracket joining it, with screws, to the stationary rail. The stationary rails are significantly shorter than the hinged rails, and are attached to them with rosehead nails. The stationary rails are dovetailed to the double-serpentine shaped end rails, and rabbeted to fit into the top of the swing leg. The end rails are tenoned into the stationary legs (tenons on the outside) and secured with two pins, visible on the inside and outside of the legs. The swing rails are tenoned into their legs and secured with two pins, which pass through the legs and are visible on both sides. The cabriole legs have slightly angular knees and rounded ankles above shod pad feet. There are traces of sapwood at the short rails and legs. Examined by P. E. Kane, J. S. Gordon and J. N. Johnson; notes compiled by T. B. Lloyd.

Bibliography

"Christie's advertisement," Antiques 121, no. 6 (June 1982): 1233.
Christie's, New York, Important American Furniture, Silver, and Decorative Arts, sale cat. (June 12, 1982), 98–99, lot 200, ill.
Michael Moses, Master Craftsmen of Newport: The Townsends and Goddards (Tenafly, N.J.: MMI Americana Press, 1984), 47, fig. 1.33.
Sotheby's, New York, Important Americana, sale cat. (January 24, 26–27, and 30, 1995), lot 2205, ill.
Christie's, New York, Important American Furniture, Silver, and Folk Art: Featuring English Pottery from the Collection of the Late Robert J. Kahn and the Lafayette-Washington Pistols, sale cat. (January 18–19, 2002), 202–203, lot 377, ill.
Lita Solis-Cohen, "Christie's, New York City, American Furniture, Folk Art, and Decorative Arts," Maine Antique Digest (December 2011): 8-B.
Christie's, New York, Important American Furniture, Folk Art, and Decorative Arts, sale cat. (September 28, 2011), 40–41, lot 15.
Christie's, New York, Important American Furniture, Folk Art, Silver, and Chinese Export Art, sale cat. (January 23–24, and 27, 2014), 117, lot 124.
Christie's, New York, Important American Furniture, Outsider Art, and Folk Art, sale cat. (January 23, 2015), 128–29, lot 151A, ill.