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Low armchair


Object number

RIF3342

Maker

Maker Unknown

Dimensions

Height: 93.98 cm (37 in.); Width: 66.04 cm (26 in.)

Date

1750–1770

Current location

Unknown

Geography

Made in Rhode Island, or possibly made in Boston
(view a map of Rhode Island)

Medium

Walnut (primary); pine (slip seat frame)

Marks

None

Inscriptions

"II," incised, on front seat rail rabbet and front rail of slip seat

Style

Queen Anne

Provenance

Christopher Champlin (1731–1805), Charlestown and Newport, Rhode Island; by descent in the Stanton, Gallup, and Hewitt families. John S. Walton, Inc., New York; sold to Joseph K. Ott (1929–1994), Providence, Rhode Island, 1969; by descent to his wife Anne Ott, Providence, Rhode Island; consigned to Christie's, New York, January 20, 2012, lot 169

Associated names

Christoper Champlin
Christopher Champlin
Stanton family
Gallup family
Hewitt family
Joseph K. Ott
Anne Northrop Ott
Christie's
John S. Walton, Inc.

Construction

The straight, slightly backward-raking, flat-fronted stiles are tenoned (without wood pins) into a flat-fronted serpentine crest rail with pointed "ears." The stiles are chamfered in back above the seat rail, square at the seat rail, and chamfered below the seat rails and below the stretchers. The straight, vasiform splat is tenoned into the underside of the crest and into the top of the molded shoe, which slightly overhangs the rear seat rail to which it is nailed, and is set into grooves in the stiles. The molded scrolling arms, with scrolling termini, are tenoned and wood-pinned into the stiles. The scrolling arm supports are tenoned and wood-pinned into the underside of the arms. The flat-arch-skirted side seat rails are tenoned and double-wood-pinned to the stiles, and tenoned and single-wood-pinned to the front legs. The rabbeted seat frame has later corner blocks helping to support a slip seat. The side stretchers below are tenoned and wood-pinned to the front and rear legs. The rear and medial stretchers are doweled into their adjoining elements. The front cabriole legs have carved knee brackets applied with glue and nails, and end in large, shod pad feet. Examined by P.E. Kane, November 11, 2011; notes compiled by T.B. Lloyd

Bibliography

Robert Bishop, How to Know American Antique Furniture (New York: E. P. Dutton, 1973), 45–46, fig. 41.
Joseph K. Ott, "Some Rhode Island Furniture," Antiques 107, no. 5 (May 1975): 940, fig. 1.
Christie's, New York, The Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph K. Ott, sale cat. (January 20, 2012), 88–89, lot 169, ill.
Patricia E. Kane et al., Art and Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650–1830, exh. cat. (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Art Gallery, 2016), 268n7.