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Photo: Courtesy of Gary R. Sullivan Antiques Inc., Sharon, Mass.; photo by Matthew J. Buckley
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Easy chair


Object number

RIF3423

Maker

Maker Unknown

Dimensions

46 x 31 3/4 x 25 1/2 in. (116.84 x 80.645 x 64.77 cm)

Date

1750–1770

Current location

Private collection

Geography

Made in Newport, Rhode Island
(view a map of Rhode Island)

Medium

Mahogany (primary); walnut and maple (secondary)

Marks

None

Inscriptions

None

Style

Queen Anne

Provenance

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lee Gill, New York; sold to Gary R. Sullivan Antiques, Inc., Sharon, Massachusetts, 2007; sold to private collection

Associated names

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lee Gill
Gary R. Sullivan Antiques, Inc.

Construction

The crest rail has an arched and chamfered top edge and a flat bottom edge; it is tenoned and wood-pinned to the rear stiles. The stiles, rectilinear in plan, are scarf-jointed and nailed to the similarly shaped rear legs, which curve rearward and are slightly chamfered at the back of their feet. The upper pieces of the wings have serpentine top edges and straight, sloping bottom edges and are tenoned and wood-pinned to the tops of the stiles. The wings? upright elements are tenoned and single-wood-pinned to their upper portions and tenoned and double-wood-pinned to the side seat rails. The side seat rails are tenoned and single-wood-pinned to the tops of the rear and front legs. The front rail is tenoned and single-wood-pinned to the tops of the front legs. The outward-scrolling armrests are nailed with brads to the inside face of the wing?s uprights and with rosehead nails to the top of their conical supports. These supports consist of curved upright boards tenoned and double-wood-pinned to the top of the side seat rails, to the outside of which are nailed with brads partially cone-shaped boards. The stay rail is tenoned and wood-pinned to the stiles at the mid-point of their joints with the rear legs. Triangular braces are nailed into each corner of the seat frame. The turned rear stretcher is doweled into the rear legs; the similarly turned medial stretcher is doweled into the blocked portions of the side stretchers. The side stretchers are tenoned and wood-pinned to the rear legs; the pins are visible at the legs? inside and outside faces. The side stretchers are tenoned without wood pins to the angular front cabriole legs, which end in shod pad feet with incised ankles. Examined by P. E. Kane, July 1, 2014; photos courtesy of Matthew J. Buckley of Gary R. Sullivan Antiques, Sharon, Mass.; notes compiled by T. B. Lloyd.

See also


Bibliography

Patricia E. Kane et al., Art and Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650–1830, exh. cat. (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Art Gallery, 2016), 77, fig. 11.