image of object
Photo: Courtesy The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Virginia, 1970-102
Click the image to enlarge

Side chair


Object number

RIF3753

Maker

Maker Unknown

Dimensions

42 x 20 1/2 x 16 1/2 in. (106.68 x 52.07 x 41.91 cm)

Date

1740–1760

Current location

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Virginia

Geography

Probably made in Newport, Rhode Island, or possibly made in Boston
(view a map of Rhode Island)

Medium

Mahogany (primary); maple (seat frame)

Marks

None

Inscriptions

"III," incised, into inside of front rail and slip-seat frame

Style

Queen Anne

Provenance

Israel Sack, Inc., New York, by 1966; sold to The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Virginia, 1970

Associated names

Israel Sack, Inc.

Construction

The slightly incurvate, flat-fronted, rounded back crest rail centers a shaped section, incurvate at the back, and is joined, in the half-round projecting shoulders, to the flat-fronted, rounded-back stiles, which are serpentine in profile. The vasiform splat, also serpentine in profile, is tenoned into the bottom of the crest rail and the top of the one-piece shoe, which is nailed with brads into the rear seat rail below, and overhangs the seat. The stiles are square where they meet the rear seat-rail in wood-pinned mortise and tenon joints, chamfered between the seat and rear stretcher, and square and backward-curving (and pieced) beneath the rear stretchers. The rabbeted, molded, serpentine side rails, with flat-arched skirts, join the rear and front legs with single-pinned mortise and tenon joints. The joints between the scalloped front seat rail and the front legs have no wood pins. The portion of the front legs above the knee bear narrow raised vertical panels with pointed-arched tops. The front cabriole legs have beaded C-scrolls continuous with serpentine beading on the adjoining knee brackets. The flat, serpentine stretchers are joined to the rear and front legs with mortise and tenon joints, wood-pinned at the front legs. The side stretchers meet the medial stretchers in half-lap joints, the proper left of which is wood-pinned. Examined by J.N. Johnson, February 23, 2013; notes compiled by T.B. Lloyd

See also


Bibliography

American Antiques from Israel Sack Collection, 10 vols. (Washington, D.C.: Highland House Publishers, 1957–1989), vol. 2, p. 363, no. 914, ill.
Barry A. Greenlaw, New England Furniture at Williamsburg (Williamsburg, Va.: The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Virginia, 1974), 60–61, no. 52, ill.