image of object
Photo: Courtesy Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Conn., Mabel Brady Garvan Collection, 1930.2583A
Click the image to enlarge

Dining table


Object number

RIF4593

Maker

Maker Unknown

Dimensions

Closed: 73.03 x 42.23 x 103.82 cm (28 3/4 x 16 5/8 x 40 7/8 in.)

Date

1800–1825

Current location

Yale University Art Gallery

Geography

Probably made in Rhode Island, or possibly made in Connecticut
(view a map of Rhode Island)

Medium

Cherry and mahogany veneer (primary); soft maple (hinged rail); eastern white pine (curved rails); hickory (pegs on fly rail)

Marks

None

Inscriptions

"Tooker / Bridgeport / Conn," in paint in a late nineteenth- or twentieth-century hand, on underside of top

Style

Sheraton, Federal

Provenance

Unknown owner, named Tooker, Bridgeport, Connecticut. Henry Hammond Taylor, Bridgeport; sold to Francis P. Garvan (1875–1937), New York; given to the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut, 1930

Associated names

? Tooker
Henry Hammond Taylor
Francis P. Garvan
Mabel Brady Garvan

Construction

Each half of the top is one board; the semicircular section has reeded edges, whereas the falling leaf has square edges. Three tenons applied to the inside edge of the fixed section fit into three reciprocal mortise holes on the inside edge of the falling leaf. Two leaf-edge tenons are also applied to the falling leaf's outside edge. The top is screwed to the frame rails from the inside. The veneered semicircular frame is composed of four horizontal laminates. The rear corners of the rail are dovetailed to the inner back rail, and rectangular glue blocks reinforce these joints. The inner back rail is nailed to the fixed part of the hinged rail through two filler pieces of wood. Two small pieces of wood are nailed to the inner rail behind the fly rail hinges. The two front legs have deep rabbets cut into their upper posts that are glued over the front rail. Finger hinges connect the fixed part of the hinged rail to the two fly rails, which are tenoned and double-pinned into the fly legs. There are cutouts in the fly legs; the upper ends overlap and support the rear corners of the frame. A stationary leg is tenoned between the fixed part of the hinged rails and is held in place against the inner rail with four pins. Source: David L. Barquist, American Tables and Looking Glasses in the Mabel Brady Garvan and Other Collections and Yale University (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Art Gallery, 1992), 146–147.

Bibliography

David L. Barquist, Elisabeth Donaghy Garrett, and Gerald W. R. Ward, American Tables and Looking Glasses in the Mabel Brady Garvan and Other Collections at Yale University (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Art Gallery, 1992), 146–147, no. 60, ill.