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Photo: Courtesy Rhode Island Furniture Archive
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Card table


Object number

RIF5341

Maker

Maker Unknown

Dimensions

Unknown

Date

1770–1790

Current location

Private collection

Geography

Made in Rhode Island
(view a map of Rhode Island)

Medium

Mahogany (primary); pine (stationary rail, glue blocks, and drawer supports); chestnut (drawer linings); oak (hinged rail)

Marks

None

Inscriptions

None

Style

Chippendale

Provenance

Private collection, 2010

Construction

The single-board, rectangular, oblong top has a half-round edge applied with wood-filled fasteners, and is joined to the conformingly shaped and edged leaf above by brass hinges in the rear corners. There are no leaf-edge tenon joints. The top is secured to its frame by screw pockets and by horizontal rectangular glue blocks. Within the frame are longitudinal supports, set into grooves inside each short rail, which hold up a small drawer with cockbeaded surround in the proper left skirt. Nailed with brads to the top of the supports are rabbeted longitudinal guides/stops. The drawer front meets its sides in dovetail joints, having large, finely cut, thin-necked pins, with half-pins above. The single-board drawer bottom is perpendicular to the front, and nailed with a single brad to the drawer back above. At the skirts of the solid front and side rails is a thumb-molded, half-round bead applied with brads. The proper left rail is considerably thicker than the front and the proper right rails, and is rabbeted to receive the top of the swinging leg. The thicker rail meets the interior rear rail in a dovetail joint, with two large, finely cut pins of slightly varying configuration, and half-pins above and below. The swinging leg of the exterior rail moves by means of a five-knuckled, round, carved-wood hinge, and is secured to the stationary rail by a (probably later) dowel. There are incurvate, open work brackets, attached with glue to the junctures of the front legs and the front and side rails. The rails are tenoned and twice-wood-pinned to the tops of the square, stop-fluted legs. Examined by P. E. Kane, November 18, 2010; notes compiled by T. B. Lloyd.