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Photo: Courtesy The Chipstone Foundation, Fox Point, Wis., 1960.10
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Dining table


Object number

RIF395

Maker

Maker probably made by John Goddard, 1723/24–1785

Dimensions

Open: 69.215 x 139.7 x 126.365 cm (27 1/4 x 55 x 49 3/4 in.)

Date

1760–1780

Current location

The Chipstone Foundation

Geography

Made in Newport, Rhode Island
(view a map of Rhode Island)

Medium

Mahogany (primary); maple and pine (secondary)

Marks

None

Inscriptions

Unknown

Style

Chippendale

Provenance

John S. Walton, Inc., New York, before 1960; sold to Polly Mariner Stone (1898–1995) and Stanley Stone (1896–1987), Fox Point, Wisconsin, 1960; bequeathed by Stanley Stone to The Chipstone Foundation, Fox Point, Wisconsin, 1987

Associated names

John S. Walton, Inc.
Polly Mariner Stone
Stanley Stone

Construction

The top of this table is new. At each side of the table a leg swings out to support a drop leaf. The two long frame rails of the skirt are made of maple and dovetailed to the short mahogany rails at one end; at the other end they are nailed to outer stationary rails, also of maple, which are in turn tenoned into the nonswinging legs. The ends of the short mahogany rails not dovetailed to the long rails are also tenoned into the stationary legs. These joints are each secured with two pegs. The maple hinged rails are tenoned into the swinging legs and secured with two pegs; they are attached to the stationary rails by means of square knuckle joints. Two maple cross braces are immediately under the top near the ends of the skirt and pass through the frame rail and stationary rail on one side, but on the other pass through the frame rail only; when the table is closed, these ends are accommodated by recesses gouged out of the hinged rails about halfway through their thickness. Another cross brace is dovetailed to the bottom of the frame rails midway down their length. The table top is attached to the frame rails and to the cross braces by pegs and screws, most of which are not readily visible. The vertical corner blocks in the interior corners are of pine. Source: Oswaldo Rodriguez Roque, American Furniture at Chipstone (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1984), 292.

Bibliography

Stanley Stone, "Rhode Island Furniture at Chipstone, Part II," Antiques 91, no. 4 (April 1967): 509, ill.
Liza Moses and Michael Moses, "Authenticating John Townsend's and John Goddard's Queen Anne and Chippendale Tables," Antiques 121, no. 5 (May 1982): 1137, fig. 20.
Oswaldo Rodriguez Roque, American Furniture at Chipstone (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1984), 292–293, no. 136, ill.