image of object
Photo: Courtesy Winterthur Museum and Country Estate, Del., Photo by Laszlo Bodo
Click the image to enlarge

Tall case clock


Object number

RIF184

Maker

Casemaker Unknown
Clockmaker William Claggett, 1694?1749

Dimensions

100 1/4 21 3/8 11 5/8 in. (254.636 54.293 29.528 cm) Width, dial: 11 7/8 in. (30.163 cm)

Date

ca. 1740 movement; ca. 1765 case

Current location

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Virginia

Geography

Made in Newport, Rhode Island
(view a map of Rhode Island)

Medium

Mahogany (primary); chestnut (backboard of case, back of hood, seat block, and base); white pine (interior blocking); aspen (interior blocking)

Marks

"Will Claggett/ Newport," engraved on rectangular nameplate on dial

Style

Chippendale

Provenance

Taken to New Brunswick, Canada, from Newport, Rhode Island, by a Loyalist family during the Revolution; by descent in that family; sold to Harry B. Carleton, Nova Scotia, and East Providence, Rhode Island; sold to The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Virginia, in 1972

Associated names

Henry B. Carleton

Construction

The arched, crown-molded, removable hood is surmounted by spherical, fluted finials with corkscrew flames, each on a plain rectangular plinth. Below the central finial is a ressaulted and scroll-carved multi-level keystone, on either side of which is an arched frieze, mounted with scrolling brass fretwork in vegetal motifs. The thumb-molded stiles and rails of the arched and glazed door are tenoned together without wood pins. The door opens to a brass dial and works, and is flanked by brass-stop-fluted colonnettes in front and brass-stop-fluted half-colonnettes in back. In the waist of the case below is a convex-blocked, shell-carved arched door, flanked by stop-fluted quarter columns with brass capitals and bases. The arched, thumb-molded top rail is mitered to its flanking stiles. The carved shell is applied above the convex door panel. At the back of the door is a quarter round applied molding, nailed with brads to the stiles and rails. The base has plain, chamfered corners, ending in lambs? tongues below. Its front face is an applied, thumb-molded panel within a mitered frame. Examined by P. E. Kane, September 2007; notes compiled by T. B. Lloyd.

See also


Bibliography

Barry A. Greenlaw, New England Furniture at Williamsburg (Williamsburg, Va.: The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Virginia, 1974), 96–98, no. 83, ill.
William H. Distin and Robert Bishop, The American Clock: A Comprehensive Pictorial Survey, 1723–1900: With a Listing of 6153 Clockmakers (New York: E. P. Dutton and Company, 1976), 24, fig. 29.
Michael Moses, Master Craftsmen of Newport: The Townsends and Goddards (Tenafly, N.J.: MMI Americana Press, 1984), 31, fig. 1.12.
Frank L. Hohmann III et al., Timeless: Masterpiece American Brass Dial Clocks (New York: Hohmann Holdings, 2009), 280–281, no. 83, ill.
Patricia E. Kane et al., Art and Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650–1830, exh. cat. (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Art Gallery, 2016), 111n19.
Donald L. Fennimore and Frank L. Hohmann III, Claggett: Newport's Illustrious Clockmakers (Winterthur, Del.: Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library, 2018), 74–75, 148–49, 176–79, 242, no. 8, WC-35, fig. 1.67, 5.20.